The Top End

A Capital Time

No tour of Australia’s Top End would be complete without visiting the capital city of the Northern Territories, Darwin. Named after Charles Darwin, but ironically Darwin never set foot on that part of Australia. Yet, this hasn’t stopped Australians from naming a university and a national park after him. Admittedly, Darwin is a pretty important historical figure and did visit Australia on his trip around the world, so a little leeway should be given.

The city itself is nothing outstanding as cities go, but it did hold a few treats for us weary travelers. First and foremost, it provided us some much needed rest and reprieve from the swelter heat that typifies the weather of the Top End. Reprieve came in the form of a room in the house of a woman named Ursula, through Airbnb. She lives with her daughter, a roommate, and much to Christina’s and my delight, a female Australian Bulldog and her puppies!

Christina with Victoria and her puppies
Christina with Victoria and her puppies

 

Christina and Matilda
Christina and Matilda

Ripping Christina away from the puppies was difficult, but we did eventually get to explore the city. One of the major tourist attractions is the Mindil Beach Sunset Market. From time to time extremely touristy things live up to their hype. The sunset market was one of those times. The sunset market has the feel of an american county fair, but as you make your way down “food alley” you notice that instead of cotton candy and deep fried everything, you find samosas, chicken satay, fried spring rolls, and fruit smoothies. Obviously, Christina and I were happy has kids in a ball pit. The rest of the market is filled with booths selling the usual handmade jewelry, paintings, photos, boomerangs, assorted nic-nacs (or x if your Australian) all with an very aussie twist to it.

Mindil Beach Sunset Market, complete with fire juggler
Mindil Beach Sunset Market, complete with fire juggler

One of the truly stunning things about the sunset market was not just the awe inspiring sunset, but the shear number of people who populate the beach during this daily event.

Mindil Beach, complete with tourists
Mindil Beach, complete with tourists. Busiest beach we’ve been on!

Litchfield National Park

After resting, playing with puppies, and washing the car it was time to hit the road again and head south to complete the Savannah Way. As we headed south we made a few stops along the way. The first of our stops was at Berry Springs. Yet another warm water river that flows in the Norther Territory much like that of Bitter Springs previously mentioned. We enjoyed a refreshing swim and lunch, but in our relaxing we failed to take a photo. But Darwin and Berry Springs were just warm ups to the main event: Litchfield National Park.

As you might have noticed, water has played a central theme in almost all the places that we visit. Either wading in the ocean or playing a spring, but nowhere has water played a more central role in our day to day activities than at Litchfield. Water and the effects it has on the landscape is the main attraction for Litchfield and you’re extremely happy it’s there since the weather requires you to have access to cool refreshing pools of water.

Litchfield has about six major attractions and we did them all. On the first day we setup our tent at Wangi Falls, but drove up the road to Walker Creek. To get to the swimming area at Walker Creek you have to hike about a kilometer and a half up a small incline. The hike alone is worth it complete with a boardwalk and really cool looking palms.

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Christina on the way to Walker Creek
Christina on the way to Walker Creek

Our next stop that day was at Cascades. At Cascades you have the option of either going to the upper falls, a hike of about two kilometers return, or go to the lower falls, about one and a half kilometers return. We were feeling a little lazy at this point and decided to do the shorter of the two hikes. We were not disappointed.

Cascades, with Christina flailing
Cascades, with Christina flailing

The next day we lounged around at Buley Rockhole and splashed around at Florence Falls. Buley was by far my favorite part of Litchfield.

Buley Rockhole, crawling with peoples
Buley Rockhole, crawling with peoples

As you can see from the photo the river has cut away at the rock creating a staircase platform effect leaving small deep pools of water to swim in at different levels. This was by far one of the most popular places in the park with people all over the place, but not so crowded that you couldn’t find a spot jump in and cool off.

As the day started to warm up we decided to walk to the next swimming area at Florence Falls. But before we got to the falls and the plunge pool below Christina spotted, I don’t know how, these really cool harlequin beetles.

Harlequin beetle. Stunning!
Harlequin beetle. Stunning!

Florence Falls didn’t disappoint either.

Florence Falls
Florence Falls

Another very popular area and for good reason. The water’s a bit cold, I could only be in for short periods of time, but very refreshing after our hike out to the falls. One particularly interesting thing that happened while we were there was that a few people climbed to the top of the falls and jumped back down to the plunge pool. If I were to guess, I would say that the height of the falls was about 13-14 meters or about 40ft. This all wouldn’t have been that interesting except that the rangers came by and gave all who were involved a very stern lecture about how jumping from rocks was not permitted. Luckily the climb up to the top of the falls looked too difficult, so I avoided being one of those being reprimanded.

On our way back to the car we saw the dried up corpse of a Cane Toad.

Cane Toad, extra crispy
Cane Toad, extra crispy

We should mention here that cane toads are invasive and are considered a menace since they endanger local wildlife who try to eat them (they eat everything and they’re toxic). So don’t feel too bad about this dried up toad.

The next day we started making our way south once more, but not before we finally explored the falls around our campsite. Wangi Falls had a beautiful plunge pool where we swam around for a bit and had a surprise for us in the form of bats!

Fruit bats hanging around, sleeping. There were hundreds!
Fruit bats hanging around, sleeping. There were hundreds!

 

The next stop was at the termite mounds. Termite mounds usually don’t inspire a lot of awe, but these termite mounds are really quite cool. What makes them interesting is that the termites construct their mounds along the magnetic poles, north-south, so that one side of their mound is always in the shade helping to regulate the temperature within the mound itself. Cool, right!?

Magnetic Termite mounds
Magnetic termite mounds

There were also some giant mounds that stood about 4-5meters tall. So, we pulled over at a particularly large one and took photos in front of it. I’m not a fan of jumptography—but Christina insisted.

Paulie being abducted
Paulie being abducted

The last stop we made before continuing on the Savannah Way was at the Katherine Hot Springs.

Paul soaking in the last of the hot springs on our journey
Paul soaking in the last of the hot springs on our journey

You can’t tell, but I’m actually quite cold during this photo. Who else gets cold in 32 celsius water? No one? Just me?

And top it all off, a photo of me in our home.

Paul in our tent, our home.
Paul in our tent, our home.

Overall, the Top End was extremely beautiful and definitely a place I would visit again if given a chance, but maybe in a different season just to see what it’s like in the wet season.

Next, on to Broome!!!

Kakadu

Kakadu National Park is Australia’s largest park, covering more than 20,000 square km. It’s over 2 BILLION years old and has been continuously inhabited by more than 52,000 years – making it one of the few places World Heritage listed for both it’s cultural and natural values. The landscapes represented in it include savanna woodlands, monsoon vine forests, broken ridges, stone country, tidal flats, mangroves, coastline, floodplains, rivers and billabongs – with incredibly rich biodiversity filling in every nook and cranny. We spent 5 days here, and barely scratched the surface!

Gunlom

One of the most famously photographed locations in the park is Gunlom Waterfall, or rather the infinity pool at the very top with views of the South Alligator River (misnamed by some explorer who had spent time in the southern US and thought the immense reptiles lurking about were alligators—not crocodiles). As you’ll see most things were named quite haphazardly, even the name “Kakadu” was created when they in misheard the aboriginal word “Gagudju” (one of the languages spoken in the region… gotta love the lazy arrogance of colonizers… Anyway, the hike was straight up a rocky mountainside, and completely worth it!

Christina in the infinity pool at Gunlom Falls
Christina in the infinity pool at Gunlom Falls

 

Paul looking over the pools at the top of Gunlom
Paul looking over the pools at the top of Gunlom

The upper pool was actually more fun to play in, it had a narrow little canyon to swim up, with huge boulders and water-carved rock holes all along it. After scrambling around some rocks we got to another tiny waterfall, and a watery cave with a giant orb weaver spider (size of my hand) with a web spanning clear across the entrance! No pictures, since we were swimming the whole time, but quite memorable 🙂

Christina at the upper pools. The canyon we swam up is right in the middle.
Christina at the upper pools. The canyon we swam up is right in the middle.

Yellow Water

After being in crocodile territory for about a month, we still had not seen a single one. So we splurged on a sunset boat cruise to spot the elusive beasts. The South Alligator River is the only river in the world protected from source to mouth, and is the jewel of Kakadu with marvelous wetlands teeming with wildlife. We ended seeing at least a dozen crocs, which made me one very happy camper.

River cruise boat. You can see the smoke in the distance from controlled burns
River cruise boat. You can see the smoke in the distance from controlled burns

 

Croc!
Croc!

 

White-bellied sea eagle. He swooped down in front of us, grabbed a turtle, and flew of with it in its talons!
White-bellied sea eagle. He swooped down in front of us, grabbed a turtle, and flew of with it in its talons!

 

Gorgeous little Azure Kingfisher
Gorgeous little Azure Kingfisher

 

Female Jabiru (stork) landed right in front of the boat as the sun was setting
Female Jabiru (stork) landed right in front of the boat as the sun was setting

 

Lovely crocodile basking in the light
Lovely crocodile basking in the light

 

Perfect sunset over the water lilies
Perfect sunset over the water lilies

Ubirr & Nourlangie

One of the main attractions of Kakadu is the ancient rock art. We learned a lot about native culture from some free ranger-led walks at these sites. Aborigines have lived there so long that their oral histories and dreamtime creation stories literally recount geologic history. I’m talking about 52,000 years worth of changes in climate and ecology. As the oceans rose and fell, the vegetation and wildlife changed with it, and the local people had to adapt by switching methods for hunting and gathering, which was all recorded in their stories, with incredibly accurate detail. One of the major creator beings is the Rainbow Serpent, who passed through the landscape creating rivers and waterholes, split the rock faces and made hills and mountain ranges, helping form the habitat for all beings. There’s also Namarrgon, the Lightning Man, a very important being in this landscape created and managed by fire.

Lookout at Ubirr rock site
Lookout at Ubirr rock site

When the first archeologists and anthropologists came to study the rock art and shelter sites, they would find a piece of something 10,000 years old and instead of spending years trying to find out what it was, what it was used for, etc, the local aborigines would wander by and tell them exactly what it was. This living archeology is virtually unheard of anywhere else.

Ancient rock art by aborigines
Ancient rock art by aborigines. The Lightning Man is on the top right, in white.

Tragically, most of the tribes have been wiped out and driven off their land, something more heartbreaking than I can possibly imagine. Even worse, there is still plenty of racism, which we casually overhear on hikes and at campsites (often times not so casually). I hope most of it will die off with the previous generations, as all the school curriculums now emphasize cultural understanding and a less biased history, and all the young australians we meet are just as disgusted as we are at the antiquated attitude. The white rangers who gave the tours (there are aboriginal rangers, too, but many of them were at a funeral the day we went) were so incredibly passionate and respectful of Aboriginal culture and did a great job of telling their stories with utter humility and with the acknowledgment that they knew just a tiny fraction of aboriginal culture and could never do it justice. Out with the old, in with the new—the better.

Enjoy the dragonfly
Enjoy the dragonfly

28 Going on 70

Right before the border of Queensland and Northern Territory on the Savannah Way
Right before the border of Queensland and Northern Territory on the Savannah Way

Up until this point not many of the names of our campgrounds have caught or kept our attention, but with a name like Hells Gate, you have to stop and take notice. The accommodations were actually quite nice for a roadhouse in the middle of nowhere. Hot showers, sink for washing dishes, delicious water, and the front desk had a free book exchange which we took advantage of.

Hells Gate also lived up to it’s name not only because the weather was about to get consistently warmer, but because the road conditions between the roadhouse and the Northern Territory border were some the worst we’ve encountered yet. Indeed, we felt like we were in hell during that part of the drive, creeping along in second gear (sometimes only first). But as soon as we reached the boarder the corrugation diminished (the dirt remained for another 100km).

The Northern Territory

Wahoo a new territory!
Wahoo a new territory!

All the corrugation and endless dirt road was worth it as we saw our first emu run swiftly across the road in front of us. No picture was taken because those things move fast! Instead of getting a picture of an emu we did find time to take a picture of some really cool termite mounds (they are a constant feature along the entire northern road).

Outback in the outback, passing by thousands of termite mounds
Outback in the outback, passing by thousands of termite mounds

The other constant by the side of the road is cattle. They roam around everywhere, including crossing the highway at whatever pace they please.

Brahman cows looking fiercely curious
Brahman cows looking fiercely curious

Our first day in the Territory ended with us camping at a free rest stop outside Cape Crawford. The rest stop had no toilets, but it did provide for a very pretty sunset and bird watching the next morning.

Sunset at Cape Crawford
Sunset at Cape Crawford
Beautiful gallahs
Beautiful gallahs

After a leisurely morning of breakfast and birdwatching we headed out for the Stuart Highway and our next stop, Daley Waters. Daley Waters was recommended to us by some greys nomads and their son who said that the roadhouse was famous for its pub and food. So we thought, hey, why not? This turned out to be a fantastic recommendation. Let me tell you why.

Daley Waters

First, when you walk into the bar you immediately can see that it has a lot of…character. And by character I mean your typical country/dive bar kitsch: panties and bras hanging from the ceiling, student IDs and international currency stapled to the walls, and lots of silly signs with purposefully bad spelling. Basically every square centimeter covered with some kind of crazy decoration.

Daley Waters Pub
Daley Waters Pub

Second, their was live entertainment in the evening. But before the show started we looked around and noticed that about 90% of the people around us having dinner were over 70 and confirmed what we’ve long suspected: Christina and I are living a retired couple’s life. Hence the title of the post.

Paul drinking a XXXX Gold
Paul drinking a XXXX Gold

Then the live entertainment started. This was by far the best part of the night. The show starts with a man named Steve standing on stage with a electric guitar slung around his shoulder and what looked like a small television setup on a table next to him. I wasn’t sure what the television was for but soon found out that Steve would be playing guitar and singing along as the words to the songs were shown on the screen next to him–essentially doing karaoke with a guitar. He played the hits from the 50’s and 60’s and even had his own rendition of ‘The Gambler’ by Kenny Rodgers. In a word it was fantastic. Just pure entertainment. I suppose the heat or the beer was getting to our heads, but we had a really good time watching this older gentleman serenade a group of his peers. We couldn’t have asked for more.

Christina drinking cider with Steve behind going to town
Christina drinking cider with Steve behind going to town

Mataranka

Our next stop, Mataranka, was another recommendation from greys we met way back on the road to Carnarvon. Mataranka is in between Daley Waters and Katherine on the way to Darwin, the capital city. The draw to Mataranka are their lovely hot springs, the best being Bitter Springs where you float down the river, hop out, walk back and jump back in again (over and over). The temperature of the water is what makes Bitter Springs special. The water temp is a consistent 32 C. That’s pretty much 90 F! The water comes from a limestone aquifer that is filled every year by the monsoon rains and spills over into Bitter Springs. The color of the water is what is most striking. I don’t have the vocabulary to describe it other than beautiful.

Crystal-blue hot spring waters of Mataranka's Bitter Springs
Crystal-blue hot spring waters of Mataranka’s Bitter Springs

It’s also been the only water so far that I could have stayed in all day and not get cold. In fact, we had to get out of the water to cool down!

Edith Falls

Our next stop was Edith Falls, which is part of Nitmiluk (Katherine Gorge) National Park and the falls are located on the north side of the park. Edith Falls has three different parts to it. The bottom plunge pool, which was only a few hundred meters from our campsite, the middle pool, and the upper pool. The upper pool is only accessible by a short walk, 1km, and the middle pool is not accessible at all, but could be viewed from a distance on a return walk to the plunge pool. We decided to do it all!

The upper pool was extraordinary beautiful. Cold, crystal clear water, cascading down the side of a basalt rock into a deep emerald pool. The water was extremely refreshing after hiking almost straight up hill, but I couldn’t stay in too long since I get cold easily. But, I soon found a place to get out of the water and jump from a rock.

Paul at Edith Falls' upper pools having a blast
Paul at Edith Falls’ upper pools having a blast

On our way back down toward the plunge pool we had to stop and take a photo of the middle pool.

Paul and Christina at Edith's middle pool
Paul and Christina at Edith’s middle pool

Once we arrived at the plunge pool we had warmed up and decided to take a dip. The water was again very cold so we didn’t spend too much time swimming around, but did manage to snorkel (always looking for freshwater crocs, but only saw fishies). A bit tired from all the swimming and hiking we decided to retire for the day to rest up for our next part of our journey at the Top End.

The Gulf Savannah

The route from Cairns, Queensland through the Northern Territory to Broome, Western Australia is called the Savannah Way, and it basically cuts across all of northern Australia.

Map 1

Undara

As we leave the East Coast, we quickly enter the outback, red roads and all. Our first stop on the journey west is Undara, home of some spectacular lava tubes. On the first night we took a sunset wildlife tour, complete with champagne and appetizers:

Sipping champagne on a volcano
Sipping champagne on a volcano
Paul's face says it all
Paul’s face says it all

The main event was sitting at the opening of one of the lava tubes while bats whizzed past us right above our heads, heading out into the night for their evening feed. Roughly 2,000 little micro bats came streaming out (in the wet season almost 20,000 bats flood out at once!)

Surreal photo of the microbats on the roof of the cave
Surreal photo of the microbats on the roof of the cave

The next morning we got to see the lava tubes in their full glory. The tubes we walked through were created about 190,000 years ago by the Undara Volcano, which boasts the longest flow of lava the world (the name Undara is aboriginal for “a long way”). They were gorgeous:

Paul under the giant lava tube archway
Paul under the giant lava tube archway
One of the biggest lava tubes
One of the biggest lava tubes
Our ranger guiding us into the abyss
Our ranger guiding us into the abyss
Map of the area's volcanic activity. The little star is where we camped.
Map of the area’s volcanic activity. The little star is where we camped.

 

Gulf of Carpentaria

As we continued our drive west, we went through some of the smallest, most remote towns of the entire trip. Many of the them just have a single roadhouse (gas station with some groceries), but others have some visitor centers with historical information. Croydon was one such stop, which had its very own little movie theater/screening room showing a film about the Australian gold rush in 1885. Next up was Normanton, which we thought would be a bustling town by comparison, but alas, it was still only a single street with a couple stores. As we loaded up on supplies, we were struck by certain items being kept in the refrigerator, like rice, pasta, flour, etc, (a hint to the temperatures they endure out here) and the very obvious lack of fresh produce. The most notable feature in town was the 30 foot crocodile statue, an exact replica of the beast caught in the river nearby. Yikes.

Christina with Kris the Croc
Christina with Kris the Croc

Ay Karumba!

Since we had driven all the way out here, we couldn’t skip the detour north to the actual coast, a little place called Karumba. We hopped out of the car and walked eagerly toward the water, hoping to be able to dip our toes into the Gulf of Carpentaria, but we were thwarted again by crocs hazard.

Paul on the beach in Karumba
Paul on the beach in Karumba

The beach itself, however, was pretty remarkable. The giant slabs of rock, upon closer inspection, were actually compressed sea shells—billions of shells. It was quite beautiful.

Countless seashells that make up the rocky beach
Countless seashells that make up the rocky beach

And then Paul found a dead pufferfish which was pretty awesome.

Dead pufferfish found in Karumba
Dead pufferfish found in Karumba

Boodjamulla

We heard wonderful things about this national park called Lawn Hill Gorge (whose original name is Boodjamulla), so we decided to check it out, even though it called for some off-roading. By off-roading I mean the sealed (paved) road ended half way and we got to endure 40km of rough, corrugated dirt:

Corrugated dirt roads. They don't look that bad, but boy are they terrible
Corrugated dirt roads. They don’t look that bad, but boy are they terrible

After a long, slow drive in, we finally made it. This gorge has been continuously inhabited for over 35,000 years. Let me just say that again: continuously inhabited for over 35,000 years. With year-round water in a near-desert, it’s easy to see why. It’s a true oasis.

Christina hiking up the escarpment
Christina hiking up the escarpment

 

Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) Gorge
Boodjamulla (Lawn Hill) Gorge

 

Lizard basking in the sun
Lizard basking in the sun

 

Bower built by a bower bird. The male makes a little hut of twigs, then collects as of lots white and green colored objects to impress the female. Notice the bones, teeth and vertebrae.
Bower built by a bower bird. The male makes a little hut of twigs, then collects as of lots white and green colored objects to impress the female. Notice all the bones, teeth and vertebrae.
Christina taking a swim at Indarri Falls. The white stacks behind are tufa formations, like at Mono Lake in CA
Taking a swim at Indarri Falls. The white stacks are tufa formations, like at Mono Lake in CA
Indarri Falls lookout (looking down at where Christina was swimming). Very popular kayaking/canoeing spot
Indarri Falls lookout (looking down at where Christina was swimming). Very popular kayaking/canoeing spot

Mad Max

As we travel around the country, we meet some great folks: European backpackers, young aussie families (some with too many kids for our taste), lots of former teachers turned grey nomad, and they’ve all been incredibly friendly and helpful, ready to give advice and tips. However, we’ve also realized there are some people on the road who we’d prefer not to encounter again. One of them was Max. Paul and I were sitting at our campsite on our last evening in the park, about to start preparing dinner. As many grey nomads do, Max was walking around the campground, checking out other people’s setups and drinking a glass of wine (with a koozie). We waved hello and smiled, happy to have a chat with another human being, so he came over. Immediately I could tell something was different. He wouldn’t look me (Christina) in the eyes. It took a good 5 minutes of chitchat before he even glanced at me. Seemed strange, but whatever, I’ll give it a pass. But as the conversation continues, a few things start to stand out: he enjoys boasting about his successful career in agriculture (he apparently designed and built half the food factories in Oz, and has travelled internationally extensively meeting many agro hotshots and stealing trade secrets), he’s racist (he boasted about laying-off 999 asian workers –keeping one to drive the new labor-reducing tractor he designed…he laughed a good bit at this one hahaha, he’s vehemently against immigrants coming to Oz on those boats, he thinks the brahman cows from India are OK, but not the people), he loves to kill animals (on his last trip to Kakadu he shot over 50 donkeys (feral)—they’re so stupid he says because when you shoot one the rest just walk over to see what happened, he once shot 2000 kangaroos, supposedly for a meat cull, he even has a gun in his truck right now, “just in case” even though it’s illegal here), and he’s sexist too (the damned wife shouldn’t be in charge of navigation, and of course, the whole eye contact thing). So all in all, it was a very enlightening talk. We learned that Australia is a lot more like home than we imagined. Gulp.

East Coast Summary

Christina & Paul's route along the East Coast of Australia, from Sydney to Cape Tribulation
Christina & Paul’s route along the East Coast of Australia, from Sydney to Cape Tribulation

At our most northern point we have driven 5102 km (3,170 miles) in 33 days. We’ve been to the Great Barrier Reef, a handful of national parks, and taken a car ferry ride. We’ve couchsurfed twice, survived more than a few rainy days, and enjoyed the warmth of the tropics. It’s only been a little over four weeks but it has definitely felt longer. Fortunately, we’ve got a system going now and we’re excited about the next part of our adventure.

As we drive, camp, and talk to the grey nomads it’s easy to get swept up in the beauty that Australia has to offer, but it is equally hard to ignore the some of the more troubling things that have come across our path. The first time that I noticed something was amiss was after a conversation with our couchsurfing host in Townsville. Katie, our host, informed us that Cairns had had one of the wettest winters on record (winter in the north is supposed to be their dry season) and that inland they were experiencing an extremely harsh drought. This brought to mind the signs I had seen earlier in the drive for cattle for sale. Those signs didn’t mean much to me at the time, but in this context it meant that people and animals were both struggling. Not to mention the local wildlife, suffering from both drought and human traffic.

Kangaroo roadkill. This was one of the nicest looking ones...
Kangaroo roadkill. This is very intact compared to the usual ones we see on the side of the road…
Puts our "low-med-high" scale to shame
Puts our Californian “low-med-high” scale to shame

The next thing I was a little surprised by, although in hindsight I shouldn’t have been, was the extent to which the coral in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) seemed to be have been damaged. The damage that I had seen was bleached coral, dislodged coral from the pervious storm season, and coral that had been kicked and dislodged by the distracted scuba diver (myself guilty as charged). I, like many of you, know or have heard that global climate change has had a great impact on the GBR, but to see the effects of climate change first hand was very profound. I was stuck by the sense that this world wonder could potentially be gone within a couple generations. I felt guilty for enjoying myself while diving and snorkeling, as well as for being there on a boat contributing to the degradation that I was seeing first hand. This guilt left me with the question: what can I do?

The answer to that question is not an easy one for me to answer while on this road trip. I know that with each kilometer that we drive, each plastic container we through away, and every boat ride we take we are contributing in some small way to a larger negative global force. Yet, here we are continuing on our way around Australia. I suppose that answer is: do the little things. Try to avoid buying plastic containers when possible, buy locally sourced fruits, veggies, and meats, and recycle when we can. More importantly, we re-use and repair everything we own and try to avoid buying things new—always  check your local thrift store first! I know we are probably being hypocritical blaming climate change for all the terrible things we’ve seen while directly contributing to it, but at least we’re thinking about our impact and that’s the first step. And that is what I’m, we’re, asking. Just take a moment and think about how our your actions are contributing to a larger global system and like us, start making small steps to stem the effects of climate change that so greatly impact places like the GBR and all the other beautiful places we’ve visited.

Thanks for reading my rant. Hope you enjoyed it.